Episode 103 - Max Carl of .38 Special/Grand Funk Railroad/Beloved 80s Movie Soundtrack Fame/Solo

April 25, 2017

People who know will tell you that Max Carl has one of the greatest voices of any living soul singer, white or black. Max may not be a household name, but he's pieced together a successful workmanlike career for over 40 years. He's put out a few solo albums dating back to the mid-70s, he's fronted a few successful bands, namely Jack Mack & the Heart Attack, .38 Special, and Grand Funk Railroad where he's been employed for going on 17 years. He's written songs for artists like Kenny Loggins, Bette Midler, Aaron Neville, and Joe Cocker and sang with legends like Rod Stewart, Elton John and Don Henley. His most recognizable legacy may be writing and singing "Second Chance", one of .38 Special's biggest hits or having his track "The Circle" featured on the Weird Science soundtrack. He's an extremely kind, sensitive and intelligent man and I love his perspective on the ups and downs of his career.

 

http://www.maxcarl.net/

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Episode 102 - Genya Ravan

April 18, 2017

The word pioneer gets thrown around a lot, but in the case of Genya Ravan it is well-earned. Genya's career has included so many "firsts", it's a crime she isn't a household name. She went from being a virginal topless model to fronting the first ever all-girl group signed to a major label with Goldie and the Gingerbreads. From there she led the popular blues/jazz group Ten Wheel Drive before going solo in the 70s and releasing a number of stellar solo albums (especially 1978's Urban Desire and 1979's ... And I Mean It!). While recording some of her own exceptional music, she also produced one of the greatest punk albums of all time, The Dead Boys' 1977 masterpiece Young Loud and Snotty. She has seen and done it all and lived to tell the fantastic story (she also published her autobiography The Lollipop Lounge, a must-read). She's the freest of spirits and biggest of personalities. An underground legend!

 

http://www.genyaravan.com/

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Episode 101 - Henry Gross

April 11, 2017

The 70s were a beautiful time for earnest, heartfelt singer-songwriters. One of the most versatile was Henry Gross, whose one and only hit was 1976's "Shannon". This tune about Beach Boy Carl Wilson's dead dog reached #6 in 1976 and placed Henry alongside contemporaries like James Taylor and Jim Croce as a force to be reckoned with. Henry is also an example of perseverance because, though "Shannon" was as good as it got on the charts, he has continued to record and perform, never losing his thirst for finding another great song. His vibrant energy leaps out of the speakers in this conversation as we ruminate on everything from music careers and creativity to politics and faith. He even talks about his Woodstock experience when he was the youngest performer that weekend (18 years old) while a member of Sha Na Na. I also get to tell him an impactful story on how he kinda sorta inspired this podcast. Enjoy!

 

http://www.henrygross.com/

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Episode 100 - Stu Cook of Creedence Clearwater Revival

April 4, 2017

This week we celebrate the big 100 with Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Stu Cook, bassist for the legendary Creedence Clearwater Revival! Everyone knows and loves the music of CCR, but sadly the band has been fraught with tension almost from the beginning. In this intensely candid conversation, Stu lays out the reasons for much of the dysfunction. It basically comes down to lead-singer and main songwriter John Fogerty on one side and Stu and drummer Doug Clifford on the other. Thankfully, Stu and Doug have been able to soldier on for over 20 years now as Creedence Clearwater Revisited playing the songs they helped to make famous. Stu also discusses CCR's Woodstock experience, the drama behind that awkward Hall of Fame induction ceremony, and the reasons for the many legal battles that have erupted over the years. We are supremely honored to have Stu celebrate the 100 milestone with us! And there's also a giveaway, so listen til the end. 

http://creedence-revisited.com/

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